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Big Data, Little Data, or No Data? Sustaining Access to Scholarship

Distinguished Lecture
Academia Sinica
While the popularity of “big data” reflects the growth of data-intensive research, “little data” remains the norm in those many fields where evidence is scarce and labor-intensive to acquire. Until recently, data was considered part of the process of scholarship, essential but largely invisible. In the “big data” era, data have become valuable products to be captured, shared, reused, and sustained for the long term. They also have become contentious intellectual property to be protected, whether for proprietary, confidentiality, competition, or other reasons. Public policy leans toward open access to research data, but rarely provides the public investment necessary to sustain access. Enthusiasm for big data is obscuring the complexity and diversity of data in scholarship and the challenges for stewardship. Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. Until the larger questions of knowledge infrastructures and sustainability are addressed by research communities, “no data” may become the norm for many fields. This talk will explore the stakes and stakeholders in research data and implications for policy and practice, drawn from the presenter’s recent book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015).
When: Tue December 6 2016 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Data, Data Citation, and Bibliometrics

Keynote Lecture
Taiwan National Workshop CODATA-ICSTI
Taskforce on Data Citation and Attribution

As scientific data grow in volume, velocity, and variety, they become ever more difficult to manage – whether by individual researchers, teams, libraries, archives, or repositories. Concurrently, researchers are asked to release and to share their data with the wider scientific community and with the public. “Data citation” frequently is viewed as a mechanism to provide credit to those who share data, to attribute data to appropriate sources, and to improve discovery and access. This wide array of objectives suggests that data citation is not a single mechanism but an amalgam of methods, goals, and practices. Data citation is making the transition from theory to implementation, posing new challenges for researchers, librarians, publishers, funding agencies, repositories, and other stakeholders. Among the complexities to consider are distinguishing between credit, attribution, and discovery; the diversity of data practices within and between scientific domains; and the origins of data citation in bibliometrics. The talk is drawn from the work of the CODATA-ICSTI Task Force on Data Citation and Attribution and from the presenter’s recent book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015).
When: Mon December 5 2016 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Academia Sinica, Taipei

The Durability and Fragility of Knowledge Infrastructures: Lessons Learned from Astronomy

Infrastructures are not inherently durable or fragile, yet all are fragile over the long term. Durability requires care and maintenance of individual components and the links between them. Astronomy is an ideal domain in which to study knowledge infrastructures, due to its long history, transparency, and accumulation of observational data over a period of centuries. Research reported here draws upon a long-term study of scientific data practices to ask questions about the durability and fragility of infrastructures for data in astronomy. Methods include interviews, ethnography, and document analysis. As astronomy has become a digital science, the community has invested in shared instruments, data standards, digital archives, metadata and discovery services, and other relatively durable infrastructure components. Several features of data practices in astronomy contribute to the fragility of that infrastructure. These include different archiving practices between ground- and space-based missions, between sky surveys and investigator-led projects, and between observational and simulated data. Infrastructure components are tightly coupled, based on international agreements. However, the durability of these infrastructures relies on much invisible work – cataloging, metadata, and other labor conducted by information professionals. Continual investments in care and maintenance of the human and technical components of these infrastructures are necessary for sustainability.
When: Sun October 16 2016 15:30 - 23:55
Where: ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark

Motivations for Sharing and Reusing Data: Complexities and Contradictions in the Use of a Digital Data Archive

Researchers face competing challenges for access to their data. One is the pressure to make their data open in response to mandates from funding agencies, journals, and science policy makers. Second is the lack of resources – human, technical, economic, and institutional – to make their data open. Third is that good reasons exist to maintain control of their data, whether to protect the confidentiality of human subjects, to gain competitive advantage over other researchers, or the sheer difficulty of extracting data from the contexts in which they originated. Researchers are encouraged – or required – to contribute their data to archives, yet surprisingly little is known about the uses and users of digital data archives, about relationships between users and the staff of data archives, or how these behaviors vary by discipline, geographic region, policy, and other factors. Digital data archives are not a single type of institution, however. They vary widely in organizational structure, mission, collection, funding, and relationships to their users and other stakeholders. This talk draws upon an exploratory study of DANS, the Data Archiving and Networked Services of the Netherlands. We mined transaction logs to draw samples of contributors to DANS and consumers of DANS data (Borgman, Scharnhorst, Van den Berg, Van de Sompel, & Treloar, 2015) and then conducted interviews with DANS archivists, contributors, and consumers to examine who contributes data to DANS and why, who consumes data from DANS and why, and what roles archivists play in acquiring and disseminating data. Early findings suggest that motivations are complex, varied, and often contradictory, and that the uses and users of DANS are far more diverse than anticipated. Implications of these findings, which draw upon the premises of the presenter’s recent book Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (2015), raise concerns for stakeholders in research data such as scholars, students, librarians, funding agencies, policy makers, publishers, and the public.
When: Wed October 5 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Where: Quello Center on Media, Communication, and Information Policy Michigan State University

Christine Borgman’s Quello Lecture in October 2016

Professor Christine Borgman, UCLA’s Presidential Chair in Information Studies, and a member of the Quello Center Advisory Board, will be giving a Quello Lecture on the 5th of October 2016 at MSU’s College of Arts and Sciences. Her latest book is entitled Big Data, Little Data, No Data, which I interviewed her about for Voices from Oxford (VOX). My VOX interview with Christine was done when we were both at Balliol College and is at: http://www.voicesfromoxford.org/video/data-in-the-digital-domain/228 The interview is brief, just over 15 minutes, but I hope it will give you a sense of the wide range of topics that Christine is likely to develop here at MSU.

Christine did her undergraduate degree here at MSU, and remains a loyal alum, and went on to a number of higher degrees, including a doctorate from Stanford in communication. You might notice the music introducing and concluding the video seems to accentuate our American accents, thanks to Sung Hee Kim, Director of VOX.
When: Wed October 5 2016 00:00 - 00:00

If Data Sharing is the Answer, What is the Question?

Data sharing has become normative policy enforced by governments, funding agencies, journals, and other stakeholders. Reasons for data sharing include leveraging investments in research, reducing the need to collect new data, addressing new research questions by reusing or combining extant data, and reproducing research, which would lead to greater accountability, transparency, and less fraud. Much of the scholarship on data practices attempts to understand the sociotechnical barriers to sharing, with goals to design infrastructures, policies, and cultural interventions that will overcome these barriers. Yet data sharing and reuse are common practice in only a few fields. Astronomy and genomics in the sciences, survey research in the social sciences, and archaeology in the humanities are the typical exemplars, and remain the exceptions rather than the rule. The lack of success of data sharing policies, despite accelerating enforcement over the last decade, indicates the need not just for a much deeper understanding of the roles of data in contemporary science, but also for developing new models of scientific practice. This presentation will report on research in progress, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, to examine three factors that appear to influence data practices across domains: How does the mix of domain expertise influence the collection, use, and reuse of data and vice versa? What factors of scale – such as data, discipline, distribution, and duration – influence research practices, and how? How does the centralization or decentralization of data collection influence use, reuse, curation, and project strategy, and vice versa? Context for this talk is drawn from the presenter’s recent book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015).
When: Tue September 13 2016 17:30 - 18:30
Where: Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, USA

How, When, and Why are Data Open? Competing Perspectives on Open Data in Science

Everybody talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. Similarly, everybody talks about open data, but few can do anything about it. “Open,” “data,” and “open data” each incorporate a plethora of concepts that vary by domain, context, and stakeholder. Scientists, software developers, librarians, data scientists, policy makers, and prospective data users often bring different conceptions to the discussion. The lack of agreement on meanings of “open data,” much less on the associated value, processes, and mechanisms, has stymied progress in practice and in policy. Rather than assuming that a single definition is possible or desirable, this panel session will compare approaches to open data across domains and across stakeholder perspectives. We bring together empirical studies of data practices in earth and geo-sciences, microbiology, biomedicine, astronomy, and climate modeling to explore questions about the value, risks, costs, benefits, behaviors, and processes associated with open data. Speakers are drawn from the Center for Knowledge Infrastructures at UCLA, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), in Boulder, Colorado, and the Research Data Alliance (RDA). Each speaker will address a common set of questions, drawing upon research conducted at a distributed, multi-disciplinary site. These questions include:

· What perspective do you bring to open data in this domain? Creator, user, manager, observer, re-user, steward, policy maker, or other role?
· What are these data and how are they used in science?
· Who are the stakeholders in these data?
· What is the scale of these data, in terms of volume, complexity, temporality, rates of change, and other factors?
· What are the characteristics of data release in this community?
· What are the characteristics of data reuse in this community?
· What data are considered “open,” and how do notions of openness vary among the stakeholders in this community?

Christine Borgman, who directs the Center for Knowledge Infrastructures at UCLA, will present framing remarks and moderate the panel. Irene Pasquetto, UCLA, will report findings from FaceBase, an NIH-funded collaboration to share data in craniofacial research. She will discuss how perspectives on open data in this community vary between scientists, computer scientists developing a sharing hub, and potential users. Also from UCLA, Ashley Sands will report on SDSS and LSST, two major astronomy sky surveys, with respect to how openness has evolved over the course of several decades. From NCAR, Matthew Mayernik presents a data professional’s perspective on how openness is manifested in different meteorological and atmospheric data repositories. Mark Parsons, RDA, will discuss how arctic data services evolved over multiple decades within the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) as the array of stakeholders with interest in arctic data has expanded and uses of the data have become politically, as well as scientifically, contentious. After a 5-minute overview by Prof. Borgman, these five speakers will make 8 to 10-minute presentations, leaving 45 minutes for discussion with the audience.
When: Tue September 13 2016 13:30 - 15:00
Where: Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, USA

Privacy Implications of Research Data: A NISO Symposium

Even as the opportunities presented by offering access to and re-use of scientific data sets become more apparent, sharing human subject data in particular is hampered by lack of a framework to address privacy and security concerns. The Research Data Alliance (RDA) and the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) are working to address that challenge through a joint interest group building a global consensus framework that will support both privacy and scientific data sharing.
When: Sun September 11 2016 08:30 - 16:30
Where: Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, USA

Data, Archives, and Chinese Buddhist Philology: Challenges for the Digital Humanities

Scholars in the humanities are unaccustomed to viewing their sources of evidence as data or to sharing and releasing those data as part of the publication process. Meanwhile, as more archival materials are digitized and as more cultural information is created in digital form, humanities scholars have turned to computational tools for analysis and interpretation. In turn, as the digital humanities adopt data-intensive methods, they often become subject to open access policies that governments, funding agencies, and publishers impose on science. The transition is an uneasy one for many scholars. This presentation centers on a case study of a Chinese Buddhist philologist whose scholarship employs evidence from material objects and digital resources to study the communication of Buddhist texts ca. 3rd to 5th century C.E. He was an early adopter of CBETA, a digital counterpart of the Taisho edition of the Chinese Buddhist canon. As CBETA expanded in scope and features over the course of a decade, it grew in value as a data source. Because these new tools are integrated into the knowledge infrastructure that serves his community, his scholarly products have become more portable across platforms, increasing the likelihood they will endure. However, these infrastructures remain fragile as they depend on invisible work to curate disparate content and technologies. Chinese texts, both ancient and modern, are particularly difficult to digitize and encode for scholarly analysis. Problems of open access, data management, curation, preservation, and sustainability loom large for the digital humanities. The Chinese scholarship case study is set in the broader context of data in scholarly communication, drawn from the presenter’s recent book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015).
When: Thu September 1 2016 00:00 - Sat September 3 00:00
Where: National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Data, Scholarship, and Libraries

Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. They are a lens to observe the rapidly changing landscape of scholarly work in the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Inside the black box of data is a plethora of research, technology, and policy issues. Concerns for data sharing and open access raise questions about what data to keep, what to share, when, how, and with whom. The stakes and stakeholders in research data are many and varied, posing new challenges for scholars, librarians, policy makers, publishers, students, and their partners.

This talk is drawn from Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015), much of which was written at the University of Oxford when the author was an Oliver Smithies Fellow at Balliol College in 2012-2013.
When: Fri May 27 2016 15:30 - 16:30
Where: Weston Library Lecture Theatre, Oxford University, Oxford, UK

Data Sharing: Where Scholarship Meets Policy and Practice - A Symposium with Christine L. Borgman

Data are essential to the process of scholarship, but remained largely invisible until the era of “big data.” The transition from process to product suggests that research data have become valuable objects in themselves to be captured, shared, reused, and sustained for the long term. Scientists, policy makers, governments, business, and the public alike now see great potential in reuse of research data. To reuse data requires that data creators are willing and able to share them. Therein lies the rub.

Data also have become contentious intellectual property to be protected, whether for proprietary, confidentiality, competition, or other reasons. Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. Enthusiasm for big data is obscuring the complexity and diversity of data in scholarship and the challenges for stewardship. Public policy leans toward open access to research data, but rarely with the public investment necessary to sustain access. This talk will explore the stakes and stakeholders in research data and implications for policy and practice.
When: Wed May 25 2016 15:30 - 17:30
Where: Attic, Soiron building, Grote Gracht 80-82, Maastricht University - Science, Technology & Society Studies (MUSTS)

Webinar: Big Data, Little Data, No data – Who is in Charge of Data Quality?

The more value that is placed on research data as a commodity to be shared, sustained, and reused, the greater the need to assure the quality of those data. Data repositories—whether domain-specific or generic across domains—are essential gatekeepers of data sustainability. Data quality is a consideration throughout the research process. To what extent should responsibility for assuring data quality be the responsibility of the investigators; of publishers, editors, and peer reviewers; of data repositories; of data librarians or data scientists; or of later reusers of those data? Considerations for data quality vary throughout the lifecycle of data handling.

These questions have neither simple nor generic answers. In this Webinar, Prof Christine Borgman (UCLA), author of 'Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World' (MIT Press, 2015), will explore these issues of responsibility for data quality in conversation with Dr Andrea Scharnhorst, head of the research and innovation group at DANS, an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
When: Mon May 9 2016 11:00 - 00:00

Library of Congress Scholar's Council Meeting

When: Thu May 5 2016 00:00 - Fri May 6 00:00
Where: Washington, D.C.

SSRC Meeting: Edge Tools in a Digital Age: New Tools, Methods and Questions for a Networked Age

Social Science Research Council and the New York Public Library host a series of panels that probes tools for an increasingly complex and connected world. Original thinkers Ann Pendleton-Jullian and John Seely Brown moderate the discussion. This conversation features game designer Elan Lee, Chris McNaboe of the Carter Center, Terry Young of Sparks and Honey, and former Navy SEAL Officer Coleman Ruiz.
When: Mon May 2 2016 17:00 - 19:00
Where: New York Public Library

UCACC Meeting

The University Committee on Academic Computing and Communications represents the University of California's Academic Senate in all matters involving the uses and impact of computing and communications technology.
When: Mon April 25 2016 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Oakland, CA

Force 2016 Conference

The FORCE2016 Research Communication and e­Scholarship Conference brings together a diverse group of people interested in changing the way in which scholarly and scientific information is communicated and shared.
When: Sat April 16 2016 00:00 - Wed April 20 00:00
Where: Portland, OR

UCACC Meeting

The University Committee on Academic Computing and Communications represents the University of California's Academic Senate in all matters involving the uses and impact of computing and communications technology.
When: Mon February 1 2016 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Oakland, CA

Closing Keynote: Dataverse in the Universe of Data

Data repositories are much more than “black boxes” where data go in but may never come out. Rather, they are situated in communities, with contributors, users, reusers, and repository staff who may engage actively or passively with participants. This talk will explore the roles that Dataverse plays – or could play – in individual communities.

When: Wed January 13 2016 16:10 - 16:55
Where: Loughborough, UK

When and Why Should Research Data be Sustained?

The goal of the workshop was to create a forum for direct interaction between the National Science Foundation large facilities and CI developer community – to explore evolving facility needs and approaches for CI, identify issues and solutions, exchange CI best practices and operational experience, and generate recommendations that can guide current and future NSF CI programs.

When: Tue December 1 2015 10:00 - Wed December 2 14:30
Where: Westin Arlington Gateway, Arlington, VA

UCACC Meeting

The University Committee on Academic Computing and Communications represents the University of California's Academic Senate in all matters involving the uses and impact of computing and communications technology.

When: Mon November 16 2015 00:00 - 00:00

Exploring Openness in Data and Science: What is “Open,” to Whom, When, and Why?

When: Mon November 9 2015 18:30 - 20:00

Who Uses the Digital Data Archive? An Exploratory Study of DANS

When: Mon November 9 2015 18:30 - 20:00

Keynote, Data Citation Principles Workshop

In 2015-16, the CODATA-ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation Standards and Practices is organising a series of workshops in participating countries. The objective is to promote the implementation of data citation principles in the research policy and funding communities throughout the world.

When: Thu October 29 2015 02:30 - 03:30
Where: National Institute of Informatics, Tokyo, Japan

Data and Scholarship

When: Mon October 26 2015 13:50 - 14:20
Where: University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan

Data, Digital Scholarship, and DANS

Seminar presentation, Digital Archiving and Networked Services

The DANS R&D colloquium is a meeting place for researchers, archivists and ICT specialists. Organized by DANS, its focus is on research data and what can be done with it.

When: Wed June 17 2015 15:00 - 17:00
Where: DANS, The Hague, Anna van Saskenlaan 51

Dataverse in the Universe of Data

Dataverse Community Meeting 2015

Data repositories are much more than "black boxes" where data go in but may never come out. Rather, they are situated in communities, with contributors, users, reusers, and repository staff who may engage actively or passively with participants. This talk will explore the roles that Dataverse plays – or could play – in individual communities.

When: Wed June 10 2015 09:15 - 10:00
Where: IQSS, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Data, data everywhere — but how to manage and govern?

Berkman Center for Internet & Society Luncheon

This talk identifies some of the challenges faced by universities in managing and governing complex categories of data. Material is drawn from Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (Borgman, 2015, MIT Press) and the UCLA Data Governance Task Force (work in progress).

When: Tue June 9 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Where: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Data, Management, and Digital Science

Technology Trends in Research Management, Showcasing Outputs & Collaboration

This presentation addresses the challenges and opportunities for active research data management, and for better collaboration and discovery tools for more specialized research data.

When: Thu June 4 2015 10:15 - 11:00
Where: Luxe Sunset Boulevard Hotel, Los Angeles, CA

EPIC 2015 Dinner

When: Mon June 1 2015 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Washington, DC

Big Data, Little Data, Open Data, and No Data

Honorary Schneider Colloquia Series, UT Austin iSchool

Based on the book Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, this talk explores the stakes and stakeholders in research data and the challenges facing scholars, students, librarians, funding agencies, policy makers, publishers, and the public.

When: Tue May 5 2015 13:15 - 15:30
Where: UT Austin, Austin, TX

Why data are not publications: Potential potholes for STM publishers

STM Publishers Annual US Conference 2015

This talk explores the role of data in scholarly communication and the implications for STM publishing.

When: Thu April 23 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Where: Washington, D.C.

Why are data sharing and reuse so difficult to do?

Data Day 2015

This talk, based on the book Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, will explore the stakes and stakeholders in research data and the challenges facing scholars, students, librarians, funding agencies, policy makers, publishers, and the public.

When: Mon April 13 2015 08:00 - 09:00
Where: Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Creating, Collaborating, and Celebrating the Diversity of Research Data

Plenary Speaker for iConference 2015

By celebrating the diversity of research data, their value and richness may be enhanced. However, that diversity poses challenges for preserving context, for stewardship, for exploiting data in collaborations across research domains, and for reuse over the short and long term.

When: Fri March 27 2015 00:00 - 00:00
Where: Newport Beach, CA

Data, Scholarship, and Disciplinary Practice

When: Wed March 25 2015 14:10 - 15:30
Where: Hanover, Germany

Big Data, Little Data, Open Data

Inaugural Göttingen Lecture on Library Futures (English, Deutsch)

The enthusiasm for big data is obscuring the complexity and diversity of data in scholarship and the challenges for stewardship. Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. They are a lens to observe the rapidly changing landscape of scholarly work in the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Inside the black box of data is a plethora of research, technology, and policy issues...

When: Mon March 23 2015 18:00 - 19:00

Big Data and Little Data Across the Disciplines

Claremont Graduate University Invited Lecture: This talk, based on the book Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, will explore the stakes and stakeholders in research data and the challenges facing scholars, students, librarians, funding agencies, policy makers, publishers, and the public.

When: Fri March 13 2015 00:00 - 00:00

RDA Fifth Plenary Meeting

The Plenaries are multi-day meetings held twice a year in various locations worldwide to provide the Research Data Alliance community an opportunity to network and collaborate with peers in various disciplines, and hear from industry experts and world leaders on topics related to research data sharing and exchange.

When: Sun March 8 2015 08:00 - Wed March 11 19:00
Where: San Diego Paradise Point Hotel, San Diego, CA

Book Signing for Christine Borgman's New Book

A panel discussion, book signing, and celebration for Christine Borgman's new book.
Join the UCLA Department of Information Studies and the UCLA library as we celebrate and host an exclusive book signing for Professor Christine Borgman's newest book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, published February 1, 2015.

Free admission. Open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.
When: Wed February 25 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Where: YRL Presentation Room 11348, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

AAAS 2015 Annual Meeting

American Association for the Advancement of Science 2015 Annual Meeting

When: Thu February 12 2015 00:00 - Mon February 16 00:00

Why are data sharing and reuse so difficult?

When: Thu January 8 2015 03:15 - 03:45

Keynote for Data Rights & Data Wrongs

Workshop presented by ICIS: Innovating Communication In Scholarship. Keynote based on Dr. Borgman's recent publication "Big Data, Little Data, No Data; Scholarship in the Networked World."

Scholars are increasingly subject to pressures from funding bodies, disciplinary norms, professional and personal ethics, and institutional directives to share their research data and make it available for reuse. There is, however, a great deal of heterogeneity across the research enterprise with respect to what is meant by ‘data’ and ‘data sharing,’ why data sharing is deemed important, and what data management strategies are considered most effective. Moreover, data are often difficult and costly to produce and share. Therefore, many scholars view these as a significant product of their intellectual labor for which they should receive some sort of credit towards tenure and promotion, authorial recognition through citation, or financial compensation.

This workshop will address theoretical concerns and pragmatic solutions that can be harnessed to help researchers comply with requirements or desires to share their data in ways they deem appropriate for their goals.

When: Wed December 10 2014 09:45 - 10:45

Ship Space to Database: Scientific and Social Motivations for a Database to Support Deep Subseafloor Biosphere Research

Paper presentation of "Ship Space to Database: Scientific and Social Motivations for a Database to Support Deep Subseafloor Biosphere Research" (Darch & Borgman, 2014) at the Association for Information Science and Technology 2014 Annual Meeting (ASIS&T 2014) in Seattle.

When: Tue November 4 2014 14:00 - 15:00

Seamless Colloquium: The Knowledge Infrastructure of Astronomy

Big data, data-intensive science, and eScience are contemporary terms to describe research fields that generate, manipulate, and manage large volumes of data. Astronomy was among the first data-intensive fields, hence many other domains wish to learn from the experience of astronomers. Their knowledge infrastructure – an ecology of people, practices, technologies, institutions, material objects, and relationships – has accumulated over millennia. Over the last several decades, the practice of astronomy has transitioned from analog to digital technologies. In turn, the broad adoption of common tools, standards, and technologies has enabled astronomers to construct infrastructure components such as the Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS), the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED), the Virtual Observatory, and data archives for missions such as Chandra, Hubble, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. While far from complete or seamless, the knowledge infrastructure for astronomy provides more comprehensive access to scientific publications and data than do most other scientific domains. This talk is drawn from continuing research by the Knowledge Infrastructures project on scholarship in astronomy (Borgman, Sands, Golshan, Darch, & Traweek, in progress) and a forthcoming book (Borgman, 2015).
When: Mon October 27 2014 12:00 - 01:00

Oct. 20, 2014: Open Access to Data: Libraries, Scholarship, and Knowledge Infrastructures

Open Access Week 2014 is an appropriate moment to explore open data, libraries, scholarship, and knowledge infrastructures. Research data are a lens to observe the rapidly changing landscape of scholarly work within and between domains of inquiry. Inside the black box of data is a plethora of research, technology, and policy issues. Data are best understood as representations of observations, objects, or other entities used as evidence of phenomena for the purposes of research or scholarship. Rarely do they stand alone, separable from software, protocols, lab and field conditions, and other context. Concerns for data sharing and open access raise questions about what data to keep, what to share, when, how, and with whom. Open data is sometimes viewed simply as releasing data without fees. In research contexts, open data may pose complex issues of licensing, ownership, responsibility, standards, interoperability, and legal harmonization. To scholars, data can be assets, liabilities, or both. To librarians, data also are scholarly products to curate for future users. However, data are much more difficult to manage than are publications, with a greater array of practices, technologies, players, and policies involved. This talk will explore the stakes and stakeholders in open access to research data, drawn from the forthcoming book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, MIT Press, January, 2015.
When: Mon October 20 2014 11:00 - 12:30

Oct. 15, 2014: Data, Data Citation, and Scholarship

Bibliometrics, long the province of information science scholars, is attracting new devotees who wish to apply bibliometric principles to data citation. One reason for this development is the growth in data volume relative to storage and analytic capacities. Fields such as astronomy, physics, and genomics are producing more data than investigators can investigate themselves. By sharing and combining data from multiple sources, other researchers can ask new questions. Another factor is advances in the technical infrastructure for generating, managing, analyzing, and distributing data. Tools are more sophisticated, bandwidth capacity is greater, and transfer speeds continue to improve. Third, and by no means least, are associated shifts in research policy. Data are now viewed as significant research products in themselves, more than just adjuncts to publications. Funding agencies now expect investigators to capture, manage, and share their data. When viewed as research products, data deserve attribution similar to that of publications. Attribution, in turn, requires mechanisms for references to be made and citations to be received. Yet data are very different entities than publications. They take many more forms, both physical and digital, are far more malleable than publications, and practices vary immensely by individual, by research team, and by research area. Institutional practices to assure stewardship of data are far less mature than are practices to sustain access to publications. All of these factors contribute to the complexity of data citation and attribution. This talk is drawn from the forthcoming book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, MIT Press, January, 2015.
When: Wed October 15 2014 12:00 - 13:00

Oct. 9, 2014: Data Scholarship in the Humanities

Click for Slides. New Trends in the eHumanities: “Big Data” offers today’s scholars vast opportunities for discovery and insight, but having the right data is often better than having more data. “Little data” can be just as valuable as big data. In many cases, scholars have no data ¬because relevant data do not exist, or cannot be found, or are not available. Moreover, sharing data is difficult, incentives to do so are minimal, and data practices vary widely across disciplines. The argument of this book is that data have no value or meaning in isolation; they exist within a knowledge infrastructure – an ecology of people, practices, technologies, institutions, material objects, and relationships. After laying out the premises of this wide-ranging investigation – six “provocations” meant to inspire discussion about the uses of data in scholarship; competing definitions of “data;” and social, policy, and economic aspects of research data – the book presents case studies of data scholarship in the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. The book also assesses the implications of these findings for scholarly practice and research policy. Concluding chapters explore releasing, sharing, and reusing data; credit, attribution, and discovery; and what to keep and why. In sum, the book argues that to manage and exploit data over the long term requires massive investment in knowledge infrastructures. At stake is the future of scholarship.
When: Thu October 9 2014 15:00 - 17:00

Oct. 2, 2014: Big Data, Little Data, Open Data

Professor Christine L. Borgman presents inaugural lecture at Göttingen University on October 2, 2014. "Big Data, Little Data, Open Data" is the title of a public lecture to be held on Thursday, October 2, 2014, at Göttingen University by Christine L. Borgman, Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The Göttingen State and University Library (SUB) organises the lecture in cooperation with Göttingen eResearch Alliance (eRA). The lecture in English commences at 18:00 CET in the Historical Library Building at Papendiek 14. It will launch the "Göttingen Lectures on Academic Information Futures", a new lecture series organised by the SUB.
When: Thu October 2 2014 00:00 - 00:00

Sept. 30, 2014: Big Data, Little Data, Open Data, and Scholarship

Lecture on "Big Data, Little Data, Open Data, and Scholarship“ and follow-up dicussion. For many years, Prof. Borgman has studied electronic scholarly communication and the role of research data. This fall, she is working as a guest researcher in the Netherlands. After giving the keynote speech at the Research Data Alliance plenary meeting we proudly welcome her as guest speaker and expert.
When: Tue September 30 2014 11:00 - 00:00

Sept. 23, 2014: Keynote Talk: Data, Data, Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink

Keynote Talk on "Data, Data, Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink" at the Research Data Alliance Fourth Plenary Meeting in Amsterdam.Click for Slides.
When: Tue September 23 2014 09:20 - 10:00

Sept. 22, 2014: Data in Motion: From Data to Science and Back

Panel Presentation of "Data in Motion: From Data to Science and Back" at the Research Data Alliance Fourth Plenary Meeting in Amsterdam.
When: Mon September 22 2014 11:50 - 12:30

Sept. 16 - Oct. 24, 2014: Visiting Fellow (DANS)

Visiting Fellow at Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS), at the Hague and Amsterdam.
When: Tue September 16 2014 00:00 - Fri October 24 00:00

Sept. 8, 2014: The Ups and Downs of Knowledge Infrastructures in Science: Implications for Data Management

Paper presentation of "The Ups and Downs of Knowledge Infrastructures in Science: Implications for Data Management," (Borgman, Darch, Sands, Wallis, & Traweek, 2014) at Digital Libraries, 2014. Click for Slides.
When: Mon September 8 2014 00:00 - Fri September 12 00:00

Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World

Yahoo seminar series: Christine Borgman

The enthusiasm for “big data” is obscuring the complexity and diversity of data in scholarship. Inside the black box of “data” is a plethora of behavior, technology, and policy issues. Publish or perish remains the clarion call of today’s scholars. Now they are being asked to release their data as well, which marks a fundamental transition in scholarly communication.

Data are not shiny objects that are easily exchanged. Rather, they are fuzzy and poorly bounded entities. Data flows are uneven – abundant in some areas and sparse in others, easily or rarely shared. Open access and open data are contested concepts that are often conflated. Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. Data are a lens to observe the rapidly changing landscape of scholarly practice in the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.

The future for libraries to manage the deluge of data is streaming with possibilities – and with challenges.

When: Mon April 21 2014 12:00 - 13:00